We have often heard the phrase "tongue and groove."

What does it mean? In the simplest terms, it means creating a joint between two boards. Read today's post to learn more about this hardwood flooring installation method.

The traditional tongue and groove


This is the only technique used for solid hardwood flooring. Every plank has a protrusion (the tongue) and fits into a slot (the groove).

This creates one surface nailed (at the corners) to the subfloor. The advantages of this technique are both aesthetic and functional.

Tongue and groove flooring have tight seams, so they don't need much nailing to hold the boards together. As a result, you see smooth, nail-free surfaces that enhance the beauty of these floors.

Not to mention you're not stepping on nails or tripping over nails. It also controls some movements that can result in cupping, crowning, and warping.

It’s technically not the same as a click-and-lock floating floor


Some products, such as engineered wood flooring or luxury vinyl, are available with a click-lock mechanism. The pieces click, mat, and then hover over the subfloor without nails or glue.

Although many refer to this as tongue and groove, it's not entirely accurate. First, click-lock isn't the same as a protrusion and slat. Also, solid wood is always nailed and never hovers.

The click-lock floating floor is uncomplicated and fast. That translates to being less expensive.
It's also easier to pick them up and move them to another location. However, solidwood floors have a more complex installation that requires some skill. It's not a DIY project.

Hardwood flooring experts in Santa Ana, CA


Many say the installation is as necessary, if not more so than the actual product. At Avalon Wood Flooring, we agree. Hardwood flooring has a visual appeal like no other.

And we'll keep that beauty intact with an excellent installation. If you live or work in Santa Ana, Irvine, Newport Beach, or Corona Del Mar, visit us at our Santa Ana, CA location.